FREE THINGS TO DO ON YOUR HOLIDAY 1770

The perfect destination for a weekend away, family holiday or even if you are just passing through – the idyllic seaside Town of Seventeen Seventy (1770) is the place to visit. Among the range of activities available there are also a bounty of Natural Attractions that don’t even cost a cent and we’re going to share them with all of you.

1770 Headland and Lookout

Drive up to the Headland of 1770 and enjoy the majestic views from our lookout.

The track starts from the parking area at the 1770 Headland and goes to and from the lookouts. The walk will take approximately 15 minutes and is an easy walk.

Walk 250 metres through windswept tussock grasslands, vine thicket and coastal woodland to a lookout at the tip of the headland. Detour 50 metres to another lookout over a small sandy cove on your return. Enjoy the glorious views over Bustard Bay and the Coral Sea.

Look for dolphins and turtles in the crystal clear waters below or spot a wide array of seabirds as they fly overhead. During the winter months, we are lucky enough to have the whales passing through as they migrate on their journey north.  They are often spotted from the headland.

The 1770 headland is a great spot to sit, relax and enjoy champagne while you enjoy a spec­tacular sunset at the end of the day.

Dogs and domestic pets are not permitted in the national park.

Red Rock Walking Trail

Red Rock Walking Trail is located south of Agnes Water.

An intermediate amount of fitness is required as the track consists of steep inclines, boardwalks, sand and stepping stones.

From Agnes Water follow Springs Road for approximately 2.5kms, you see a sign on your right “Reedy Creek Reserve”, turn left, directly opposite onto a gravel track for 800 meters and park near the trees. There is a sign marking the start of Red Rock Walking Trail.

The beaches and the scenery are just to die for! You may even sight turtles and a dolphin or two. The track is to the right as you enter the beach and to Red Rock will take a good hour of walking or several hours if you wish to stop and take a swim.

November and December are the best months to catch a glimpse of the nesting mother turtles. Be sure to keep your distance if you notice any mother turtles making their way up the

Wear good walking shoes, bottle water, hat, sunscreen, and maybe a little snack/lunch.

Paperbark Forest Walk

This would have to be one of my personal favourites and something I always do a few times a year as it constantly changes depending on the time of day you visit and also how much rain we may have had.

From the town of Agnes Water follow Springs Rd to the south for a little over 2.5km. Look for the large Reedy Creek Reserve sign near a gravel car park on the right hand side of Springs Rd.

Special note: This walking trail is not suitable for all people including the very young or those with limited mobility or balance. You’ll en­counter obstacles, stepping stones, fallen debris, water crossings, steps and rough surfaces that require good balance.

This short but spectacular forest walk will take you into the heart of a very special type of forest, rarely seen in such pristine condition. The specially designed track makes it possible to penetrate the thick lush undergrowth and then you’re completely surrounded by hun­dreds of paperbark tree trunks and the green fronds of the cabbage palm. Keep an eye out for butterflies and richly coloured fungi.

A picnic table at the start/finish of the walk makes a great spot for a cup of tea.

1770 Foreshore

The Foreshore of 1770 is truly a beauty to behold and many hours can be spent whiling away the day enjoying the beach, creek, sandbanks and parklands. Many seabirds inhabit the sandbanks at low tide including pelicans, terns, sea gulls and cormorants to name a few.

Continue walking along the foreshore and you will be lead to the steps on top of the hill taking you to the Captain Cook Monument.

This sight designates the landing spot of the crew of Captain Cook’s ship – The Endeavour – when they visited on the 24 May, 1770 and that’s how we got the name.

Anywhere along the foreshore is the perfect spot to sit and watch the sun as it sets at the end of the day. The Town of 1770 is where you will witness the most spectacular sunsets. One of the few places on the East Coast of Australia that you can watch the sun do down over the ocean.

Eurimbula National Park

Within easy 4WD driving from Agnes Water/Town of 1770.

Eurimbula National Park features a transition of vegetation and landforms that are unique in Central Queensland. Over the past 6000 years, parallel dunes have built up on the coastal edge of Eurimbula National Park. Now covered in heaths, these dunes support a myriad of habitats. Botanically, this is a key coastal area that preserves a complex mix of vegetation including some plants common in both southern and northern areas.

Look for the marked changes in plant communities from mangrove-fringed estuaries, freshwater paperbark swamps and coastal lowland eucalypt forests with weeping cabbage palms to tall rainforest with elegant hoop pines.

Sand bars and tidal estuaries provide the ideal habitat for visiting and resident shorebirds.

Deepwater National Park

The park’s diverse vegetation of coastal scrubs, eucalypt woodlands, wet heaths and sedgelands surround Deepwater Creek and its tributaries. Tannins and other substances leached from surrounding heath plants stain the creek water brown. The creek is fringed by tall forests of swamp mahogany, paperbark and cabbage palms, and is broken in places by shallow sections of reed bed and paperbark forest. In these areas water only flows during the wet season.

Deepwater supports diverse birdlife such as emus, red-tailed black-cockatoos, honeyeaters, brahminy kites and waterbirds. Nesting turtles frequent Deepwater Beach from October to April, turtle hatchlings emerge from the nests from January, usually at night.

Agnes Water Beach

We make claims of the final destination for surfing on the East Coast of Queensland at the most northern surf beach available. Surfing is a very popular activity for locals and visitors alike. Bring your board and enjoy the main beach and other locations close by for some great surfing opportunities

Walk the 6 kilometre stretch of pristine beach on an early morning and you may spot turtle laying or hatching (in season), an array of sea birds frolicking in the shallows and even the odd kangaroo or wallaby may join you on your saunter.

You may see many species of terns, white-bellied sea eagles, turtles, dolphins and large schools of fish. Look out for pretty seashells washed up from the iconic Great Barrier Reef.

This beach also makes a wonderful location for a spectacular wedding ceremony with many accommodation options within easy walking distance of the beach.

So plenty of opportunities to get back to nature and enjoy our wonderful landscape, birds and other attractions that our small sea side town has to offer. Come and visit today and remember to stay for a sunset over the water.